Tag Archives: Security Situation

Sudan

The security situation in Sudan is very unstable and in some areas, particularly in and around Darfur, are prohibited areas. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office recommends that all travel to some areas and all nonessential travel to the other, may consult with their national government in the matter.

Headlines – Sudan becomes two countries: With the hammering out a peace agreement, the people of South Sudan went to the polls in January 2011 a referendum on whether the country should remain whole or divided into two – who voted overwhelmingly in favor of the independence of northern Sudan. On July 9, 2011, Sudan is divided into two, giving rise to the world’s newest nation: Southern Sudan. Even discounting the 40 year war with their combined total estimated 2.4 million dead, the buildup to the secession of South Sudan has not been easy and the road ahead is likely to be turbulent. For the latest news on Sudan, check out updates from the BBC news. We are in the process of updating Lonely Planet’s website to reflect the change.

Lonely Planet before the change in Sudan: Sudan is the largest, however, one of the least visited countries in Africa. Despite several ongoing conflicts mean much of this vast country remains out of bounds, travel is possible, in the northeast, and parts of southern Africa where transitions in the tropics. The pyramids and other ancient sites covering the northern deserts may pale compared with the best Egypt has to offer, but you can experience that no other person in sight – and this sense of discovery is often repeated in cities, too, and tourists from Sudan road is still only a trickle. And although loneliness is a big star, visitors always agree that the Sudanese are among the most friendly and hospitable land, with a natural generosity, which contrasts with their poverty, and that alone makes any trip worth the penalty. Whether you run through a journey from Cairo to Cape Town, or have a slow month taking history and hospitality, visiting Sudan is an eye opening and rewarding experience.

sudan

Angola

Angola is a revelation – in more ways than one. Marked by years of war painfully debilitating and untouched by foreign visitors since the 1970s, the country remains remote and unknown, with few observers of both the geographic highlights and vast cultural riches that are hidden behind a veneer violent appearance. But with the recent removal of a 40-year civil conflict ushering in a prolonged period of peace and stability, opportunities for exploration opens in silence. For outsiders the attractions are many. Despite widespread poverty, corruption, innate and infrastructure devastated by decades of indiscriminate fighting, Angola has an appeal that few countries can match. Here, in the heady heat of equatorial Africa, you will find some of the most polite of the continent and discover many of its best kept secrets.

Relax on the long beaches, solitude shows untouched natural parks or sift through the ruins of Portuguese colonialism. From Luanda to Lubango, the nuances are alarming.

Despite advances in infrastructure and the security situation improved dramatically, travel to Angola remains the preserve of adventurers, fanatics or those budgets.But flexible transport network gradually recovering and wildlife that are sent to repopulate the depleted national parks, signs of recovery are more than a mirage.
angola
Angola is halfway along the path of economic and political atonement, and it would be a shame to lose the chance of a spectacular renaissance.