Tag Archives: Mosques

Syria

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office advises against all travel to be Syria and those in the country out by commercial media. Please ask your government for more information.

Syria has more than its fair share of important historical sites. The ancient cities of Damascus, Aleppo and Bosra are all listed on the World Heritage List as a stunningly beautiful city is the ruins of Palmyra. Mighty Crusader castles, labyrinthine souks of medieval jewelry, like the houses of Damascus and sacred Umayyad mosques are just some of the delights on offer, there are many more for those who are willing to look. Best of all is the fact that these monuments are often part of the fabric of everyday life – the cult of the local mosques, shopping in markets, drinking tea houses and picnic in the ruins. And travelers are happy to be added.

Speaking of picnics brings us to the piece de resistance when it comes to a Syrian and Journ – food. The national cuisine is simply superb, so come with a big appetite. You are required to be filled in many ways when they finally tear away.

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Tartus, Syria’s second port, is a small, ungainly that it is unlikely to set pulses racing, but what makes for a visit pleasant overnight. Main attraction of the city are the compact remnants of the Old City (known by the Crusaders in Tortosa), a fascinating little maze. There is also the island once fortified Arwad, located offshore a few miles and arrive by boat or water taxi. Syrian Tartus love for its beaches, but visitors brave enough to pick through the trash in the sand and swim to take into account the occasional dribble of sewage into the sea.

Serbia

Serbia (Srbija) should reach the comfort zone of most tourists, but to get rid of Slobodan Milošević and become a democracy, the nation is now knocking at the doors of Europe, and at the same time is a safe and welcoming to visit. The most interesting point is, without doubt, the capital, Belgrade, a city gritty, full of energy. Cultural enthusiasts can revel in its architecture and museums, foodies in its restaurants, while party animals will not get any rest to explore the endless nightlife.

Plans and the Vojvodina quiet Fruška Gora monasteries provide an effective antidote to urban chaos, while Novi Sad is home to the renowned Exit festival world music. Proud and traditional southern Serbia is a country of lush rolling hills and wooded valleys rub the rugged mountains. The medieval monasteries Manasija, Sopocani Studenica and remain the guardians of the faith of Serbia and Byzantine art, while the mountains of Zlatibor and Kopaonik offer fun in the snow in winter and hiking in summer glory. Mosques mix with monasteries in Novi Pazar, where life in the Turkish quarter continued much as it did a century ago, when the Turks were still in power.

A few miles south is Kosovo, a disputed land divided by the different interpretations of history. For Serbs the cradle of their nation, by the Kosovo Albanians that their independence is the future. The UN still recognizes Kosovo as part of Serbia until the current talks decide their future.

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Kazakhstan

The world’s ninth largest country is one of his last trips to large uncertainties. Although the outside world is becoming aware of Kazakhstan, largely thanks to its oil and the antics of the pseudo-Kazakh Borat Sagdiyev, few have really explored this land of varied attractions.

Easily the most economically advanced of the ‘stans’, post-Soviet Kazakhstan is reinventing itself as a Eurasian nation prosperous and modern one. The commercial and social center of leaf, Almaty, has an almost European, with first class hotels, boutiques, cafes and elegant smooth streets thick with BMW and Mercedes. Astana in the north, is transforming rapidly into a capital Quickfire Century 21 with a unique blend of Islamic architecture, futuristic West, the Soviet Union and crazy. President Nursultan Nazarbayev has ruled Kazakhstan since the Soviet era, does not encourage political opposition, but getting to forge a peaceful and multiethnic nation – making it generally quite popular.

Around the periphery of the great steppes, where people of Kazakhstan, once nomadic, being famous for his skills with horses and equestrian sports only – used to walk, Kazakhstan presents a series of amazing adventures. You can walk on foot or horseback in the spectacular Tian Shan and Altay mountains, watch the flamingos on steppe lakes or discover mysterious underground mosques near the Caspian Sea. Community ecotourism programs in some of the most beautiful areas allow travelers to stay with village families at an affordable cost.
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With passengers still rare here, a foreign guest is usually treated not as a tourist, but with true hospitality and townspeople will be out of their way to help. Enjoy while it lasts!